Policy Brief Discussion 2: Trauma and Resilience

proactive approaches/resilience

In response to this question - again, system-wide education, which would include information and implementation of supportive *tools* (as mentioned: safety cards, yoga, relaxation, exercise, focusing on feelings vs. facts) can foster a sense of empowerment and forward motion, rater than feeling stuck in the trauma and its impact. "We are here to give you tools to help manage the negative effects of stress" is one approach ...more »

Submitted by (@kryscooperlcsw)

Policy Brief Discussion 1: Are the Children Well?

Community schools are a viable option for two-generational impact

Community schools place health and wellness alongside learning and family supports to reinforce two-generation impact. Through community school partnerships, schools become hubs for early childhood education, well-child visits, family financial literacy, after school and summer programs, behavioral health counseling, high school and college preparation, and much more. Further, community schools present an opportunity ...more »

Submitted by (@nicolejohnson)

Policy Brief Discussion 2: Trauma and Resilience

Illness vs. Wellness? Trauma-informed educational training

In attempts to educate admins, teachers, and students about the impact of trauma on learning, I've had mixed responses. Admins/some teachers tend to view a "trauma-informed" models (Sanctuary, trauma-education, reflective supervision) as focused on "illness," making excuses for poor behavior, and stigmatizing. Other teachers are more open, and during training, one can see the "light bulb" moments happening for them ...more »

Submitted by (@kryscooperlcsw)

Policy Brief Discussion 1: Are the Children Well?

Is this really a shift from illness to promotion of wellness?

The point is that mental health policy needs to effectively develop a full intervention continuum: (1) promotion of mental health, (2) a focus on prevention of MH related problems, (3) a focus on responding as early after the onset of problems as is feasible, and (4) enhanced systems of care. It also needs to encompass a sophisticated approach to the role of schools. It is especially essential not to present wellness ...more »

Submitted by (@adelman)

Policy Brief Discussion 3: Fragile Families

Are long-term solutions and remediation the best we can do for today's children?

This study makes clear the damage done to child development and lifelong well-being to black families in disadvantaged neighborhoods where their exposure to community violence is shockingly high. Remedial or long term changes in communities are important, but the window to help kids during their critical early years is short. The evidence tells us we need to add an urgent focus on preventing or stopping stopping harmful ...more »

Submitted by (@samuels)

Policy Brief Discussion 3: Fragile Families

If violence is the symptom, what is the cure?

Community, domestic and parental violence are all symptoms of the same disease - trauma. 'Fight' is a trauma response and if you live in the survival part of your brain, as many survivors to, then everything will be seen as a potential threat with only one conditioned response - violence. There really is no separation between the types of violence, only that resilience depends on whether you have experienced a physical ...more »

Submitted by (@lgodbold)

Policy Brief Discussion 1: Are the Children Well?

School-Based Health Centers are integral to achieving Wellness!

School-Based Health Centers can be the link among several report recommendations to achieve wellness in children and youth. SBHCs increase access to integrated health services, support families and students through universal wellness programs and direct mental health services, and influence school climate through teaching trainings, social-emotional learning programs, and youth-led stigma reduction campaigns. In order ...more »

Submitted by (@aliciarozum)

Policy Brief Discussion 3: Fragile Families

What examples are there of models, programs or strategies that already are breaking down these silos

The Academy on Violence and Abuse (www.avahealth.org) is an interdisciplinary, non-profit professional organization that brings together experts in the health impacts of violence and abuse from across disciplines and settings. This collaborative, research-focused group was created to address the concerns highlighted in a 2002 report released by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) regarding the health impact of violence and ...more »

Submitted by (@candaceburton)